COMPETITIVE PROGRAM
 

Various athletes from the recreational program are selected to attend the National training centre to train in the Olympic sport of gymnastics. These athletes take part in practice sessions ranging between 1 ½ to 15hrs per week.

Once the athlete has achieved a certain level, they are ready to perform in a competition. The Bermuda Gymnastics Association offers a great opportunity for children to travel around the world and
represent their country at international competitions.


Senior Team member, Tabytha Hofheins at the USAIGC National Competition


Depending on where the Bermuda Team travels, there are different rules for competition. This means, over the course of a year the gymnasts may have to change their routines to accommodate the varying regulations rules. Some of the rules that the BGA compete under include the following:

FIG + FIG MODIFIED - Federation of International Gymnastics
USAG - United States of America rules
USAIGC - United States of America Independent Gymnastics Clubs rules
Canadian rules


 

APPARATUS (WOMEN'S)

Vault (VT)
Height from the floor = 1.25 meters
Runway Length = 25 meters (for both Men & Women)



Each vault is awarded a value according to its difficulty. The height and the length of the vault are of crucial importance together with the exactness of the turns before and after the somersault and the controlled landing.

Gymnasts perform only one vault for Qualifications, Individual All-around and Team Final unless they are attempting to qualify for a "Finals Competition" on the event. In this case, the gymnast must perform two different Vaults under the FIG stated rules, the scores of which are then averaged. The top 8 gymnasts then compete in the Vault Final.

 

Uneven Bars (UB)
Low bar (from floor to top of bar) = 170cm
High bar (floor to top of bar) = 250cm +/- 1cm
Maximum width (between bars) = 180cm.


Swinging and continuous movements are required on this apparatus. The exercise should include movements in both directions, above and below the bars. Elements with twists and somersaults with multiple grip changes and high flight should be demonstrated to maximise scores. Often a spectacular dismount ends the routine.



Balance Beam (BB)
Height of  beam (from the floor) = 1.25 meters
Beam Length = 5 meters long 
Beam Width = 10 centimeters.




A routine on the beam should be an artistic combination of a variety of acrobatic elements, gymnastic leaps, jumps, turns, step and running combinations, waves and balance elements in standing, sitting and lying positions. The gymnast should use the entire length of the beam, demonstrating elegance, flexibility, rhythm, tempo, balance, confidence and control. Dismount series of acrobatic elements can be very spectacular. The maximum time on beam is 1’30”.



Floor Exercise (FX)
Dimensions =  12 x 12 meters
Safety border = additional 1 meter around



The performance area must have a surface elasticity to allow for power during take-off and softness for landing.

The floor exercise is accompanied by music to enhance the performance. Routines should combine dance movements and sequences with a variety of tumbling and acrobatic elements. The whole floor area should be used with the exercise being varied in mood, tempo and direction. Individuality, originality, maturity, mastery and artistry of presentation are key ingredients for a high score.

 

APPARATUS (MEN'S)


Floor Exercise
Dimensions =  12 x 12 meters
Safety border = additional 1 meter around




The performance area must have a surface elasticity to allow for power during take-off and softness for landing. Men's floor exercise is not accompanied by music, but is rather a 60-70 second long routine consisting of 3-4 tumbling passes and a variety of skills that demonstrate flexibility, strength and balance.


Pommel Horse
Height from the floor = 1.15 meters



Many consider the Pommel Horse to be the most difficult of the gymnast events. The hands are the only part of the body that is allowed to touch the horse throughout the routine while the gymnast performs a series of swings, cirlces, handstands, and balances atop the apparatus. The goal of the exercise to complete the routine with a steady and controlled rhythm.


Still RIngs
Height from the floor = 2.7 meters


  During a routine, the rings should be absolutely still and under the complete control of the gymnast which requires the athlete to maintain proper body position throughout their performance. Routines must include two strength elements - one swing-to-strength element and the other a static strength element - each element being held for at least 2 seconds. Once the routine is completed, the athlete will release the rings in a dismount and land in a controlled, stuck position on the mast below.

Vault
Height from the floor = 1.25 meters
Runway Length = 25 meters (for both Men & Women)



Each vault is awarded a value according to its difficulty. The height and the length of the vault are of crucial importance together with the exactness of the turns before and after the somersault and the controlled landing.

Gymnasts perform only one vault for Qualifications, Individual All-around and Team Final unless they are attempting to qualify for a "Finals Competition" on the event. In this case, the gymnast must perform two different Vaults under the FIG stated rules, the scores of which are then averaged. The top 8 gymnasts then compete in the Vault Final.


Parallel Bars
Height from the floor = about 2 meters
  Length of bars = 3.5 meters



A parallel bar routine consists of swinging and flight elements between, under and on top of the apparatus. During a routine, the gymnast is required to execute an under swing, or basket swing, as well as various swinging elements from a support, hang and upper arm position. The most difficult skills require the gymnast to lose sight of the bar and have enough body awareness to recatch the bar in the proper position.


High Bar
Height from the floor = 2.7 meters



The high bar is typically the most crowd-pleasing of the men's apparatus. It consists of a serious of swings and flight elements that require the gymnast to release the bar, perform a trick in the air and safely recatch the bar. High level athletes often complete multiple flight skills in a row. The most impressive part of the routine is the dismount where the athlete releases the bar, completes up to 3 flips or twists in the air, and sticks their landing on the mats below.